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My Town: WMU-Cooley Law honors the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

My Town: WMU-Cooley Law honors the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. - In celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, WMU-Cooley Law School and the school’s Black Law Student Association hosted a viewing of the documentary Martin Luther King Jr. – The Man and The Dream.

Following the documentary, a discussion was held about the impact King has had on individuals, the community and society. Leaders of the group discussion also contemplated what society would be like today if King was not assassinated 47 years ago.

“It’s important to reflect back on the work Dr. King accomplished almost 50 years ago and to consider what else we can do in terms of establishing equality,” said Te Smith, president, WMU-Cooley Black Law Students Association. “We all enjoyed celebrating his legacy together and the impact he has had on society.”

 

My Town: Downtown student population doubles as WMU shuts down Beltline campus

My Town: Downtown student population doubles as WMU shuts down Beltline campus

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.—Hundreds more college students will pack downtown Grand Rapids starting next week, as Western Michigan University temporarily shuts down its Graduate Center-Beltline location.

The campus on East Beltline is expected to remain closed for seven months during extensive renovations, displacing approximately 550 students.   Beginning Jan. 12, those students will take spring classes at WMU’s Graduate Center-Downtown, doubling the WMU population at that location.

"We're excited to welcome Beltline students and faculty to the downtown location," says Roxanne Buhl, regional director, WMU-Grand Rapids. We're certain they will enjoy everything the downtown area has to offer, while local businesses will have the opportunity to serve new customers with the increase of students over the next seven months."

Michigan virtual school ranks in top 10 percent

Michigan virtual school ranks in top 10 percent

According to the Mackinac Center for Public Policy’s recently-released ranking of 659 Michigan high schools, 

My Town: No school, no problem! Four tips to keep your student learning over the holidays

My Town: No school, no problem!  Four tips to keep your student learning over the holidays

During the winter break from school, many students will pack away their books and turn their attention away from learning. 

To help ensure your students are still learning, statewide virtual learning school, Michigan Connections Academy, is sharing activities you can do as a family to keep your young students busy and their brains active over the break.

1.       Practice math while baking holiday cookies. Students struggle with fractions and always want to know when they will “use math in real life.” The perfect time to practice fractions is while you are baking cookies. Two-thirds of a cup plus 1/3 of a cup equals one whole cup, which your child will see as you work on making those cookies, helping develop a real life connection to what they are learning in school.

My Town: Sixth grade students face off in Cupcake War

My Town: Sixth grade students face off in Cupcake War

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.— The baking battle is over, and the winner is West Michigan charities.

Wednesday, sixth grade students from Blandford School, Zoo School and CA Frost Environmental Science Academy competed in their own Cupcake War to raise money for local charities.  The students worked in teams of four to create a cupcake that would take top ratings in theme, appearance, design and taste.  They also had to incorporate a special ingredient.

The Best of Show award went to Blandford School.  Zoo School sold the highest percentage of their cupcakes, and CA Frost Environmental Science Academy sold the most cupcakes.  Altogether, the schools raised $656 selling their cupcakes, which will go to the schools’ charity of their choice.

My Town: Diocese of Grand Rapids hires school recruiters

My Town: Diocese of Grand Rapids hires school recruiters

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich.— The Diocese of Grand Rapids has hired two more people to ramp up enrollment for its Catholic schools.

Dan Plachta will serve as an admissions enrollment field consultant, guiding the diocese’s 29 schools in outreach and recruitment. While supporting current students, the diocese plans to focus on traditionally underserved groups who could take advantage of school tuition assistance, which is quadrupling to $1,000,000.

Plachta is an alumnus of Blessed Sacrament School (now All Saints Academy) and Catholic Central High School in Grand Rapids.

“As a graduate of Catholic schools in the diocese, Dan brings a personal passion for the importance of Catholic education in West Michigan,” said David Faber, superintendent of Catholic schools.

My Town: Diocese of Grand Rapids boosts tuition assistance; deadline nears

My Town: Diocese of Grand Rapids boosts tuition assistance; deadline nears

The Diocese of Grand Rapids is boosting tuition assistance for students, but time is running out to apply for it.

The deadline for applying for first round funding is Nov. 22.  The first round of grants will be announced in early February and distributed in early fall.

Bishop Walkowiak recently announced the Diocese is more than quadrupling tuition assistance, from $240,000 to $1 million each year.  The funding boost, made possible through donations and diocese scholarship accounts, is part of a three-year effort to make Catholic schools affordable to more families.  According to Private School Aid Service, even after all tuition assistance is distributed, Catholic school families still need $1.2 million a year.