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Transportation

G-Sync: The Future We Vote Forward

G-Sync: The Future We Vote Forward

By Tommy Allen, Lifestyle Editor

On May 3, it is in our hands to make a positive impact in our community by voting yes for expanded public transportation.

Few elections matter more than the one that will, in many ways, directly impact our region for years to come. It may even determine if your children or grandchildren will decide to remain here or move on. All data points that this is what hangs in the balance.

Of course, there are plenty of other items on the ballot that are equally as important to our future. Who will sit as a trustee at the Grand Rapids Community College? 

Will it be a person with true education experience? Or someone who just wants to push a short-term agenda that is severely anti-diversity -- an unwelcoming move in our region that is not a part of the education excellence we have crafted in all of our institutions of higher learning in our region for decades.

Free Concert - Rapid Revolution

Free Concert - Rapid Revolution

Rapid Revolution will address the May 3 millage vote to improve West Michigan's bus service. Saturdays concert will be an informative afternoon of music and speakers who will addresses the benefits of an advanced public transportation system.

Musical acts include Petals Rang The Bell, Paucity, Stepdad, Rick Chyme and Super Lazy Genius. Guest speakers include State Rep. Brandon Dillon, County Commissioner Jim Talen, Mayor George Heartwell, Local First's Elissa S. Hillary, The Goei Center's Bing Goei, West Michigan Environment Action Council's Rachel Hood and Rapid Growth's (and recent video spokesperson for Rapping on the Rapid) Tommy Allen will join many others who'll present personal and professional reflections on what the future looks like for West Michigan.

Public Transportation 101 or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Transit

Public Transportation 101 or: How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love Transit

By Nicholas Monoyios

The importance of cultivating vibrant and healthy cities is generating more public attention than ever. From swanky social events to helping the homeless, the passion to improve this community is taking all forms. A critical ingredient in the recipe for community success is high quality public transportation.

Many of us who have traveled to bigger cities instantly see the obvious presence of public transportation. From local buses to subways, these routes are the essential blood vessels of urban areas. However, successful, efficient, and effective public transportation in our metropolitan area cannot be seen as a reactive solution solely for relieving busy streets. It is a proactive infrastructure that improves social equity, environmental quality and economic stimulation. Public transportation is sustainability for our community.

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

VIP Evening Parking Program in Downtown Grand Rapids

VIP Evening Parking Program in Downtown Grand Rapids

Do you frequent evening or weekend events and businesses in downtown Grand Rapids?  The City of Grand Rapids VIP Evening Parking Program is a great way to save money and the hassle of finding a parking spot downtown.

For the low cost of $16 per month park between 5 pm and 6 am at Pearl and Ionia Parking, Cherry Commerce Parking Ramp, Weston Commerce Parking Ramp or Monroe Center Parking Ramps.

I have personally used the program and it is convenient and easy to use.  The only restrictions are the strict parking times to enter and exit the ramps, and in some ramps you must park above a certain level.  A parking access device or card is issued.  Payment is automatically deducted monthly from a credit card and you may cancel at any time.  Most city ramps charge $7.00 for evening events.  If you go downtown more than twice in a month, the pass is paid for.

G-Sync - At The Intersection of Houston and Portland

G-Sync - At The Intersection of Houston and Portland

From Rapid Growth:

Numerous studies tell us that as oil prices rise, major population shifts begin. But most importantly, our personal transportation choices are subject to change -- especially in urban areas.

If you have traveled abroad, then you know very well what cities have excellent public transportation and you know which ones don't.

The lack of good public transportation is why you get a Houston, but once in a while, you get a Portland. Successful public transportation all comes down to planning.

The United Nations conducted a worldwide population study a few years ago, showing that by the year 2030, our urban centers will contain the vast majority of population growth. People will be migrating back to the cities because essential services are best served in dense regions.

While the mega-cities will grab plenty of headlines and people, the significant new growth will be happening within the smaller cities.

2011 Grand Rapids Bicycle Summit on May 6th

2011 Grand Rapids Bicycle Summit on May 6th

 

The Greater Grand Rapids Bicycle Coalition is putting on the 2011 Grand Rapids Bicycle Summit, a full-day bicycle advocacy conference for bicycle club members, trail supporters, elected and public health officials, and the general public. Held at Grand Valley State University's Eberhard Center on May 6th, the day's keynote speakers are nationally-known bicycling and pedestrian advocate Darwin Hindman, former mayor of Columbia, Mo., and Peter Lagerwey, the pioneering Seattle bicycle planning consultant.

Conference tickets are $15 including lunch; free tickets are available to those with limited incomes. Bicycle parking provided by CycleSafe; auto parking is free in the Fulton Lot south of the Eberhard Center.

City of Grand Rapids to hold neighborhood meeting to discuss sewer project

City of Grand Rapids to hold neighborhood meeting to discuss sewer project

From: http://www.grcity.us

A neighborhood meeting was held last fall to discuss the work that will be undertaken as part of this project. Questions were brought up at this meeting in connection with the number of trees that would be removed. As a follow-up, we invite you to attend a public neighborhood meeting at which project staff will present updated information about which trees will be removed and proposed planting of new trees.